young boy thinking

November 20, 2020 2 min to read

OCD and self-harm in teens

Category : Health

Self-harm or self-injury is a dangerous pattern of behavior, also known as non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). This condition may be difficult for some people to understand, as they don’t see why anyone would want to harm themselves. With self-harm, the intention is not to die but rather to cope with some kind of emotional distress.

Self-harm is a behavior that is related to many different mental health concerns. Teens may engage in self-harm due to depression, anxiety, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), amongst others.

Self-injury may be terrifying for the people involved, and it cannot be dealt with appropriately by anyone other than a mental health facilities for teens.

While many know that self-injury can result from depression or anxiety, often, people don’t realize that it can also be associated with OCD. In this article, we will explore self-harm OCD.

Continue reading to learn more about this condition and understand how you can help the teen in your life if they’re engaging in self-harm.

What Are the Common Types of Self-Harm?

First, it’s important to understand how self-harm may manifest. According to an article published by the American Journal of Public Health (AJPH), self-harm in adolescents ranges from 6.4% to 14.8% in boys and from 17.7% to 30.8% in girls.

Because self-harm is so prevalent, it’s not surprising to learn that there are many different ways that teens may invoke injury upon themselves. Anytime a teen is engaging in self-harm, it is cause for serious concern.

While there are seemingly endless ways that teens may harm themselves, some are more common than others. Some of the ways teens express self-harm include:

– Burning themselves
– Cutting themselves with a razor blade or other sharp object
– Giving themselves bruises (punching or hitting)
– Pulling out their hair
– Poisoning themselves (with alcohol, drugs, or poisonous substances)
– Starving themselves (anorexia) or purging (bulimia)

Why Do Teens Self-Harm?

There are many reasons why teens may self-harm, all of which are related to deeper issues. Teens experiencing mental health crises may engage in self-harm and may keep it a secret from those around them.

Thus, if your teen is experiencing mental health issues, it’s important to look out for signs of self-harm.

If your teen is wearing long sleeves and pants in the warm weather, they may be attempting to hide some evidence of self-harm.

Additionally, if your teen appears very thin but is wearing oversized clothing, they may have engaged in self-harm in the form of anorexia or bulimia.

While there are numerous reasons why your teen may be engaging in self-harm, some of them are more prominent than others…
 
Continue reading the article and learn more about OCD on Life Is An Episode website.
 
 

You may also like these articles

  • The best ingredients for succulent smoothies
    If you're an individual with a hectic lifestyle, you may find it difficult to maintain an adequate intake of nutrients especially if you're a fitness freak who is determined to maintain an admirable physique.To that end, you will find that preparing smoothies is the bes...
  • The major benefits of hand sanitizer and how to buy the right stuff
    Chances are good that even if you were not the kind of person to use hand sanitizer just a few months ago, you probably are that kind of person now.Thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic, men and women all over the world have gained a newfound respect and need for that sometim...
  • 7 major early warning signs of diabetes
    More than 34 million Americans have diabetes, and approximately 90-95% of them have type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes means a person has high blood sugar levels. If you have this condition and don’t know it, you could be risking severe complications.Recognizing the warni...
  • Nootropics side effects: how common are they?
    For many people, nootropics are a true miracle supplement. They help them boost their memory, enhance their brainpower, and even fight conditions like ADHD and Alzheimer’s.Are there side effects that come with nootropic pills, and if so, how common are they?Keep reading...

Leave a comment